United Arab Emirates

Introduction


US Nursing: United Arab Emirates

A nurse will find that the heat of the United Arab Emirates is located in the southeast of the Arabian Peninsula and on the Persian Gulf. To the east is Oman and southwards one finds Saudi Arabia. Across the Gulf one finds Qatar and Iran.

A nurse will discover that the United Arab Emirates is a federation of seven emirates with each one being governed by a hereditary emir. The emirates are Abu Dhabi (the capital), Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah, and Umm al-Quwain. Abu Dhabi is the state’s center of political, industrial, and cultural activities. Islam is the official religion and Arabic, the official language.

Since 1962, when Abu Dhabi was the first emirate to begin exporting oil and since 1962 the country’s society and economy have been dramatically transformed. Nurses will read that the late Sheikh Zayed, ruler of Abu Dhabi and first president of the UAE, drove the development of all the emirates and directed oil revenues into healthcare, education and the national infrastructure.
Nurses will be living in this small geographical area, where the oil reserves are ranked as the world’s seventh-largest. It also possesses the world’s seventh largest reserve for natural gas resources. It is now considered one of the most developed economies in Western Asia and per capita income is the world’s seventh-highest.

The oil is predicted to run out around 2100 AD and the attractive, green and distinctly Arab city of Abu Dhabi is really getting moving. It is not as cosmopolitan or as sophisticated as Dubai however Abu Dhabi also lacks traffic jams and artificiality. It is a much calmer and liveable city. There is no doubt that Abu Dhabi has chosen its development projects wisely.

The emirate of Abu Dhabi is huge by comparison to the other emirates, comprising almost 87% of the country’s total area. Just as 50 years ago Abu Dhabi was little more than a fishing village comprising a fort, a few coral buildings and a smattering of barasti huts, the rest of the emirate is very “Arabian Sands’ with its enigmatic empty desert, dotted with oases such as Al-Ain and Liwa.